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ISIS Beheads Syrian Soldiers, Puts Heads on Poles in Town Square

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Feelings of new sexual love cure every disease in man. Dump your old feminist wife, stock up on butea superba, tongkat ali, and Viagra, and go to China where you are a king.

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An Indian Woman’s Search For An Orgasm

I just found out that the Hindi word for orgasm is ‘kaamonmaad’. It sounds so sanskaari that I feel I’ll smell agarbattis when I climax! Now, why was I looking for this information? Well, that’s because I recently found out that August 8 is celebrated as the International Day of the Female Orgasm! It is actually a holiday in Brazil.

But in the seven years that I have been sexually active, I’ve not had an orgasm seven out of 10 times. It’s almost as if my G-spot can only be found using GPS. But sometimes I wonder, is anyone even looking for it? Sometimes I wonder, given our culture, how many Indian women even experience an orgasm?

I mean a lot of us get into bed with a complete stranger because mommy and daddy told us that’s our duty. Our sanskaars teach us that women are expected to be givers in bed. That we are expected to lay their lumps and bumps bare to please their men, preferably those men who have the legal right to enter and exit their vaginas at will… consent be damned… I mean, marital rape is just a western / feminist conspiracy to deprive hard working men the right to a happy married life, isn’t it?

Look beyond islands of privilege like Mumbai, Bangalore, Pune and Kolkata. Drive down to any tier-II or tier-III city. You will find the entire neighbourhood decked up in near-regal finery to celebrate organised relationships where young virgin women, who have never had the benefit of any sex education, are suddenly expected to let a man they barely met twice violate their bodies for the rest of their lives. Layers of pan cake slathered on their faces (courtesy Pammi aunty from Lovely Beauty Parlour two doors down) cannot hide the fear in the eyes of these young brides.

With each passing day, sex becomes a chore for these women, a duty born out of a social obligation to provide the family with an heir. I wonder if these women have orgasms? Or are they just too busy justifying their existence by proving the productivity of their uterus?

Also, is it just a problem in semi-urban and rural areas? I personally know several modern, highly educated, urban women compelled to turn into glorified baby production machines. Some such women have suffered domestic abuse when they suggested that their husbands start using contraception. I have often asked these women if they have considered leaving such . Most have stayed on for the sake of the children. Some have made peace with their fate. Some even rationalise it.

“At least he lets me work,” says one. “He isn’t wrong. Contraception is against our religion. Besides motherhood is God’s greatest gift to women,” reasons another. I tried explaining Stockholm Syndrome to them. They shut me out of their lives for trying to break up their happy families. One even said I was jealous as I had been easy and “given myself to too many men” and that no “good” man would ever want to marry a “damaged” woman like me.

As a parting shot I asked if she had ever had an orgasm, she said she thought Minute Maid was too pulpy and preferred making fresh orange juice at home. It all ended with a face palm!

I’ve read about horror stories out of Africa where female genital mutilation is common. Apparently they cut out a part of the clitoris, so that the woman can never feel pleasure while having sex. Another reported practice in some marriages in a few Middle-Eastern communities involves stitching the vagina so that a woman cannot have sex. The stitches are removed only when her husband wants sex. If she conceives as a result of the sex, she is celebrated as a future mommy. If not, the vagina is stitched back again. It is almost as if a woman is punished for having a vagina!

So, before you dismiss my quest for an orgasm as a first world problem, I ask you this… why do you think a woman should not enjoy sex? Why must sex always be about procreation? Aren’t there 7 billion of us on this planet? Why is it sinful for a woman to seek sexual satisfaction? Whatever happened to recreational sex? And why is it too much to ask your sexual partner to make an effort to arouse you?

I’m yet to come across a man who refuses a blow job. But ask them to eat pussy and they come up with interesting excuses including, “Aaj Mangalwaar hai!” And then they have the nerve to complain when I start swearing. Never mind the “chinal”, “kutiya” and “randi” that comes my way with amazing regularity.

Why? Because I like being on top, because I like kissing, because I want pillow talk and cuddling? Because I want to be more than a night-time parking space for a penis. It is because I’m not ashamed of my body. It is because I love sex. It is because I want to enjoy sex.

We already have Right to Education and Right to Information. Perhaps we need the Right to Orgasm. But then again, we live in a country that still doesn’t understand the concept of consent. Ah, well… a girl can dream.

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Serge Kreutz lifestyle consultancy is available for 10,000 USD. It covers setting up in Asia and how to enjoy an endless series of love affairs with young beautiful women. No prostitutes but students and virgins.

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The multiverse theory explains why each of us lives in an own universe in which we may as well be immortal.

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Taxpayer-Funded Duck Penis Researcher Now Studying Whale Penises

A leading researcher on a ridiculed taxpayer-funded study of duck penises is now using her expertise on orca whales and is going to the "March for Science" to protest budget cuts.

Patricia Brennan, a visiting lecturer at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, worked on the duck penis study that received $384,949 from the National Science Foundation, a grant that was funded through the 2009 stimulus package. The study looked at the differences in the corkscrew-shaped penises of ducks.

A recent interview with New England Public Radio revealed that Brennan is still fascinated by genitalia of various marine animals, this time one from an orca whale that was just delivered from Sea World to her lab.

"Holy cow," Brennan said when the penis first arrived. "Oh wow. Oh my goodness. It's enormous!"

"Although Brennan has spent 20 years studying the sex organs of marine animals, she's never seen anything this big," New England Public Radio reported. "It takes up an entire lab sink."

"So this is the tip right there," Brennan said. "It's not super long, it's just wide."

Brennan is on a new mission to protest budget hawks in Congress and the Trump administration seeking to cut funding for frivolous research.

She is attending the "March for Science" this weekend as a political activist, even though what "she'd really like to do, is get back to the lab and take another look at that killer whale penis."

New England Public Radio said the "stakes for science have never been higher," because Donald Trump is president and has called for budget reductions in the face of a $20 trillion debt.

Trump's budget blueprint would leave the National Institutes of Health with $25.9 billion. The National Science Foundation was not mentioned in the budget blueprint. The agency currently gets roughly $7 billion annually.

Since taxpayers were informed about how much her duck penis study cost, Brennan has become a "sought-after science activist," giving lectures on how scientists can defend their research.

"They were attacking everything," Brennan said of news outlets reporting the cost of her study. "They were attacking the science itself, like, ‘what a waste of money.' They were attacking me, as a person, like, I must be some kind of deviant to be looking at penises.

"Like, who does that?" she asked.

New England Public Radio explained that Brennan is a "basic scientist," meaning she only observes how things work and is not "necessarily applying that knowledge to a particular problem."

There is no real premise to her new research on orca whale penises. "Just the fact that we just don't know what we're going to find is so exciting," she said.

"In order for us to actually be able to solve problems, or make money, or innovate, we actually need to know … about how the world works," Brennan said.

Brennan justified her duck penis study by explaining that it discovered male ducks rape female ducks and that both duck vaginas and penises have evolved in response to "sexual conflict."

"Males have counterclockwise spiraling penises, while females have clockwise spiraling vaginas and blind pockets that prevent full eversion of the male penis," Brennan explained in Slate.

"Male ducks force copulations on females, and males and females are engaged in a genital arms race with surprising consequences," she said, adding, "male competition is a driving force behind these male traits that can be harmful to females."

Brennan says she now tells researchers to "come out swinging" to defend their own "weird-sounding stuff."

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This site contains photos of brutality. Semantically and philosophically speaking, the photos are not brutal. What is brutal is the depicted reality.

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Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants suicide bombers. Only the patriarchy as a social and political system can achieve justice.

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What We Don’t Know about Sex in the Middle East

Zocalo Public Square

After ten years writing and traveling through the Middle East, John R. Bradley decided to tackle the subject that everyone talks about without saying much: sex. In Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East, Bradley reveals the many different ways countries across the region talk about and regulate sex. Below, he chats with Zócalo about legal prostitution in Tunisia, hour-long marriages in Saudi Arabia, and what West and East have in common when it comes to sex.

Q. What are some of the assumptions those in the West have about sex and the Middle East?

A. For me, what is most striking is that in the space of a century these assumptions – or what I would call misconceptions or fantasies – about the Middle East have changed so radically.

Until the early 20th century the Middle East, in the eyes of the West, was an exotic place of intriguing decadence, of secret harems and lecherous pederasts, a sensual region where Westerners could indulge in sexual behavior, or at least report on it, in perhaps the only way that was unlikely to cause consternation at home. Now the opposite idea prevails: the Middle East is sexually barren, horribly repressive, and anti-sex in a way that contrasts with the supposed licentious and libertarian West.

Both of these narratives, I think, tell us as much about the preoccupations of the West, and the West’s projection of its anxieties on other peoples and cultures, as the reality of how sexuality has played out in the Middle East historically or continues to do so in the present. But what most intrigues me, and is the main theme of Behind the Veil of Vice, is the remarkable resilience of competing cultural identities and attitudes toward sex in the countries I explore, which include Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Bahrain, Iran, and Yemen.

A vibrant underground continues to flourish in private, and sometimes even in the open, in the local, strongly rooted communities I have lived and worked in, despite the strange, faceless, sexless rules the minority fundamentalists want to put over public life. Essentially, we’re talking about the vast gulf that exists between private and public morality, which is normal in any culture during any period of time you care to mention.

Q. Can you discuss broadly the status of sex and sexuality in the Middle East, particularly through the status of institutions like prostitution and marriage?

A. I think it is defined pretty much in the same way that it is the West, by what I call in the book a kind of higher hypocrisy. However, it is very difficult to make broad generalizations about the whole region, and that is precisely what the book tries to show.

For example, in Tunisia prostitution is legal and regulated, and every main city has a red-light district. Because the staunchly secular Tunisian regime thankfully does not allow the radical Islamists any opportunity to participate in the political or social life of the country, and because Tunisia has a deeply entrenched feminist tradition, the issue of legalized prostitution is of little concern to the average Tunisian man or woman. At the same time, the Tunisian regime takes a very dim view of unregulated prostitution, and has introduced laws that have successfully helped to restrict its practice. In contrast, in Egypt prostitution is officially illegal, despite the fact that the country is still ruled by an essentially secular regime. However, prostitution is everywhere in Egypt, involving both male and female sex workers. This fact is often highlighted by the Islamists, who are afforded a role in Egyptian political and social life, as a sign that the country has lost its moral way.

Elsewhere, the status of prostitution in the Middle East varies greatly. In Syria, it is quietly tolerated. In Bahrain, there is a thriving sex industry catering mostly to Saudi sex tourists, and the issue has become central to the Islamists’ campaign to rid the island of so-called Western influence. Having said that, in Saudi Arabia itself there is also a thriving sex industry, albeit in a less brazen way than exists in Bahrain, something attested to by the frequent raids of brothels by the Saudi religious police, even in the holy cities of Mecca and Medina.

Where Saudi Arabia – and Iran and Egypt – really come into their own is with what are called “temporary marriages.” The rules vary, because of the different Shia and Sunni traditions, but they can last for anything from an hour to a year or two, and are perfectly legal in these three countries. Moralizers of various stripes argue that temporary marriages are basically a cover for prostitution, and often they are; but in some ways it does not matter what you call them. That 70 percent of all marriages in Saudi Arabia these days are reportedly of the temporary variety is a wonderfully uplifting statistic. The country’s religion has found a back door permitting what it ostensibly forbids, which is what every functioning religion, or for that matter ideology, needs to do, if ordinary people are to live sane and healthy lives.

Here, as in many other aspects of life that often baffle Western observers with their inconsistency; Middle Eastern sexuality has once again proven itself solidly resistant to restrictive and oppressive dogma.

Q. We in the West seem sometimes obsessed with the idea of sex and sexuality in the Middle East, as some of the commentary you highlight about suicide bombers and the veil illustrates. Why do we take this attitude, and how does it thwart our understanding of and interactions with the Middle East?

A. In any civilized culture, anyone arguing that suicide bombings by Islamists are the result of sexual repression among males in the Middle East would achieve little more than making himself an object of scorn and ridicule. Alas, the West has long since ceased to be civilized when it comes to discussions of sexuality, and the fact that there are pundits who actually make a living spouting such nonsense should be a source of eternal shame for us all.

It isn’t surprising that such pundits are often avowed Zionists. For them, focusing on the alleged sexual hang-ups of the September 11 suicide bombers is a very useful way to deflect attention from complex foreign policy issues, including America’s role in the Middle East and specifically its unconditional support for Israel.

Q. What was the impact of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on the sexual mores of the Middle East? What about the “family values” revolution in the West? Where does that leave us today?

A. Numerous events during 1979 in the Middle East, and in particular the Iranian revolution and the siege of Mecca by radical Islamists, ushered in a wave of Islamic fundamentalism that fed into and changed the region’s political and religious discourse surrounding personal choices, including the most fundamental ones involving sex.

But we should remember, too, that in 1979 and 1980 elections also brought to power Ronald Reagan in the United States, with the support of Christian evangelicals, and Margaret Thatcher in Britain, whose “family values” rhetoric was no less extreme for not being explicitly couched in religious rhetoric. As a result, we all find ourselves in the midst not of a clash of civilizations, as is popularly thought, but a convergence of religious fundamentalisms.

With this intermixing of sex, politics, and religion, hypocrisy has inevitably grown in the West, as it has in the Middle East. Deviation in both regions is increasingly defined as disorderly, dirty, and sinful by puritans of various stripes. My book draws attention to the central paradox that, as intolerance has increased, so has vice, because as the range of acceptable behavior decreases so the definition of vice broadens, and more people therefore are by default engaging in unacceptable behavior.

Once we recognize that exchange between consenting people is the foundation of any liberal society, then we realize that accepting sexual variety is a sign of a healthy, not a corrupt, society. When sex outside of controlled channels is defined as deviance, it is the most exposed, the least powerful, who suffer. Behind the veil of vice lies the sanctimony of those who would impose their way – be it sharia or evangelicalism of a Christian or so-called feminist hue – on people who are defined as sinners, the fallen, and so requiring protection and salvation. The vice lies in the exploitation, in the coercion, that results from forcing natural human drives and needs into the shadows.

That is the ultimate perversity, and it is what the West today has most in common with the Middle East.

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If you are still invested in the real estate of European cities, get out! A terrorist attack with chemical weapons will happen. Even if it doesn't kill many people, it will drive prices down. Accross the continent.

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It is only a question of time until butea superba will be outlawed in the Western World. In some people, it can cause hypersexualization that can last for weeks. And it can easily be added to food to improve taste. Imagine a Thai restaurant breeding hundreds of super horney women prowling for any man they can get, and that for weeks on end.

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Pedophile sting ops roil U.S. forces on Okinawa Controversial operations in which sailors pose online as underage girls lead to dozens of NCIS arrests

SPECIAL TO THE JAPAN TIMES

Since 2015, at least 36 U.S. service members on Okinawa have been arrested in child sex stings operated by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

Those detained have belonged to all branches of the military — with marines in the majority — and their ranks have ranged from private to lieutenant colonel. Typically they have received sentences of between two and three years in military prison, and upon their release they will be required to register as sex offenders in the United States.

Details of the operations were revealed by two American lawyers — Timothy J. Bilecki and Stephen H. Carpenter Jr. — who have represented some of those service members arrested. Both lawyers have criticized the methods employed by the U.S. Navy’s law enforcement agency.

According to Honolulu-based Bilecki, in the operations, NCIS agents task female sailors with posting messages online, including in the personals section of Craigslist and on the Whisper messaging app. After being contacted by service members, the sailors pose as bored young women, engage in sexually provocative chat and, at some point during the conversations, they describe their ages as 14 or 15 years old. NCIS agents arrest the service members when they go to meet the females in person — either at a house temporarily leased to the NCIS within Kadena Air Base or an ice cream shop in American Village, a popular tourist area in Chatan Town.

The operations have been nicknamed “To Catch A Predator” due to their similarities to the contentious NBC reality TV show that aired from 2004 to 2007.

Basing his estimates on U.S. Marine Corps records, Bilecki says the Okinawa operations have netted at least 36 service members, but he believes the actual number may be as high as 50.

Contacted by The Japan Times, the NCIS declined to comment on the operations, saying it does not discuss the details of ongoing investigations.

According to its website, the NCIS is comprised of more than 2,300 members in approximately 40 countries tasked with investigating major criminal cases involving or targeting the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Its special agents can conduct arrests of service members and civilians on- and off-base. In Japan, the NCIS is headquartered at Yokosuka Naval Base, Kanagawa Prefecture, with four subordinate offices, including one at Camp Foster, Okinawa, from where it is believed the sting operations are directed.

Bilecki is highly critical of the way the NCIS conducts the operations. He says following the arrests, NCIS agents dupe the suspects into writing letters of apology to the nonexistent girl’s mother. He also questions why the NCIS sends photographs of adult women to the service members when encouraging them to meet.

“NCIS is using the wrong bait. If they are really looking for pedophiles, then why don’t they send pictures of kids?” he said in a recent interview.

Highlighting the NCIS’s mishandling of the operations, explains Bilecki, is one case tried in March 2016. Following the arrest of a marine staff sergeant, he says, the female sailor playing the role of the young girl gave the suspect her real mobile telephone number and later engaged in sexual relations with him. According to Bilecki, the sailor was consequently removed from her position.

The marine ultimately received a sentence of 15 years in prison — partly due to his sexual relationship with a real high school girl, which was uncovered during the investigation. The final sentence was reduced to two years because of a pre-trial agreement.

Seattle-based lawyer Carpenter, who has represented one of the marines and advised others charged in the Okinawa sting, describes the operations as “a network of sophisticated law enforcement tricks.”

“These kids (service members) are bored — indeed the only outlet they have is the internet, which, for NCIS, is like shooting fish in a barrel, except for the fact that these young marines aren’t fish, they are human beings with families and friends,” he told The Japan Times.

The morality of the NCIS operations has sparked heated debate online. On June 25, 2016, Bilecki posted a video on his law firm’s Facebook page following his successful defense of a marine accused of offenses including attempted sexual assault and abuse of a child. In the video — also viewable on YouTube (bit.ly/bileckisting) — he accused the NCIS of “absolutely entrapping people into committing crimes they wouldn’t otherwise commit.”

The Facebook posting has garnered 126,000 views and more than 530 comments. Although many people appeared to agree with Bilecki’s view that the NCIS operations were unjustly ensnaring service members, other posters seemed to support the operations. “Sting or not (the service members) are showing up to sleep with little girls! NCIS is protecting our alliance with Japan!” wrote one commentator.

Almost eight months since the video was posted, Bilecki remains outspoken in his criticism of the NCIS. These operations, he says, are being conducted “like an assembly line” with very little oversight. They are designed to boost arrest rates and make the NCIS look good, he says.

In recent years, there have been other high-profile arrests of American pedophiles on Okinawa.

In January 2015, a marine chief warrant officer admitted to 18 charges of sex crimes against children, some of which involved a child under the age of 12. He was sentenced to 144 years in military prison by a military judge at Camp Foster but the term was reduced to 20 years due to an agreement with the court.

In July 2015 a civilian employee at Kadena Air Force Base was convicted of sexually assaulting a minor on the base and filming the attack with his mobile phone. At a trial that took place in the U.S., he was sentenced to five years in prison.

Meanwhile, an undated case posted on the website of the Dallas-based law firm of Stephen P. Karns details how a first lieutenant in the army, stationed at Kadena, was arrested for possession of “983 image files and 41 multimedia (movie) files of suspected child pornography.” The soldier was allowed by his command to resign instead of facing a court martial, and it appears he did not receive any other punishments. Nor was he required to register as a sex offender.

“This high number of cases suggests there is a real problem with sex offenses in the U.S. military on Okinawa,” says Manabu Sato, a professor of political science at Okinawa International University. “Whenever there is an incident off-base involving a service member, the military likes to claim it is a one-off but these cases show such behavior is not an exception. If the military cannot even protect people within its bases then how can they claim to be able to prevent crimes from occurring off-base in Okinawan communities?”

On March 10, the first pretrial conference for Kenneth Franklin Shinzato is scheduled to be held at Naha District Court. The former U.S. Marine is charged with the rape and murder of a 20-year-old Okinawan woman in the city of Uruma last April. The crime ratcheted up anti-military tensions in the prefecture, host to the majority of U.S. installations in Japan.

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When women don't have sex to trade, they are inferior to men in almost every capacity. That is why in a future world in which sex robots are the partners of men, women won't have influence. They seldom had, anyway, throughout history.

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Because executions by swordare such good fun to watch, ISIS has many fans worldwide. No business is like show business.

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